Main Dish

Brussel Sprouts, Sweet Potatoes and Eggs with Pomegranate Molasses

Can you believe I STILL have sweet potatoes from my garden?! Whether it really was a good harvest or just the fact that I took 8 weeks off from cooking during my campaign, I am not sure.  But here is what part of the harvest looked like.

img_4669

We got some nice brussels sprouts this week, so I decided to make a roasted veggie and egg dish inspired by Ree Drummand’s Beautiful Brussels Sprouts.

Roasted vegetables with olive oil fried eggs is probably the favorite comfort food in our house. Adding the pomegranate molasses and chili powder added some new and interesting flavors. I ended up liking it more and more with each bite. Don’t go too heavy on the pomegranate molasses, all it needs is a drizzling. And then….happiness in our mouths and bellies!

Brussel Sprouts, Sweet Potatoes and Eggs with Pomegranate Molasses 

inspired by Ree Drummand’s Beautiful Brussels Sprouts

2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced (from the garden)

2 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, halved

4- 6 Tbsp olive oil, separated

Chili powder

pinch Kosher salt

pinch freshly ground black pepper

8 eggs (from Farmer Kim)

Pomegranate molasses

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375F.

Divide the sweet potatoes and Brussels sprouts between 2 baking sheets.

Drizzle 2 – 3 Tbsp olive oil on the vegetables, sprinkle with chili powder (heavier if you want more kick, lighter if you want just a touch of heat), salt and pepper. Toss to thoroughly coat the vegetables. Place in the oven a roast for 15 minutes.  Stir the vegetables and roast for another 15 – 20 minutes.

In the last few minutes that the vegetables are roasting, heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in a large skillet (I prefer cast iron) over medium-high heat.  Fry the eggs, spooning oil over the yolk for a few minutes til cooked to your preference. You will likely need to fry the eggs in batches.

Divide the vegetables among 4 plates and top each with 2 eggs. Drizzle the pomegranate molasses over the top. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Serves 4.

Categories: Kosher, Main Dish, Recipe, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetarian | Tags: | Leave a comment

Quajado

Our Spanish Passover continues…

Lauren is home, so we needed a vegetarian dinner option and opted for a Quajado, an egg, cheese and vegetable dish. For tonight, we used zucchini, feta and cheddar. The combination was simply delicious. Salty, rich and slightly sweet.

To complete the dinner we added a Spanish spinach dish with pine nuts and raisins. The combination was served on my grandmother’s beautiful depression glass plates.

Quajado

from Chabad

1 medium onion, diced

1 Tbsp olive oil

6 eggs (from Farmer Kim)

6 cups zucchini, grated and left to drain in a colander

1 cup creamy feta cheese

1 cup grated cheddar

2 Tbsp fresh parsley, chopped

salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Sauté the onion in the olive oil until soft.

Squeeze any excess moisture out of the grated zucchini.

Combine zucchini, onions, eggs, parsley and cheeses. Add salt and pepper to taste. Feta cheese is extremely salty so it may not need any salt at all.

Spoon into a greased 9 x 13 inch baking pan. Bake at 350 for approximately 1 hour, until set.

Serve warm or at room temperature. Enjoy!

Serves 8.

Categories: Kosher, Main Dish, Passover, Recipe, Vegetarian, Zucchini | Leave a comment

Persian Sweet Potato Stew

It feels so good to be cooking again. Making dinners and baking breads really does serve to center me. Especially when I get to use foods I grew. Even though I am planning and preparing my garden for this season, I still have lots of sweet potatoes that I harvested in the fall.

FullSizeRender 14

This stew was fabulous. It was very reminiscent of Qormeh Sabzi, yet different. And it was and easy. And best of all, unusual for Persian dishes, it is ready an hour after you start chopping the onion.

IMG_5840

It is a flexible dish; as we were eating it, we though of various other possible additions: green beans, kidney beans, other greens, etc. It is only limited by your creativity.IMG_5841

Persian Sweet Potato Stew

inspired by Yotam Ottolenghi’s Iranian Vegetable Stew with Dried Lime

1 Tbsp grape seed oil
1 large onion, peeled and finely diced
½ tsp ground turmeric
1½ tsp cumin seeds
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 Tbsp dried fenugreek
1 Tbsp dried dill
1 1/2 lbs waxy potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1 1/2″ chunks
1 1/2 lbs sweet potato peeled and chopped into 1 1/2″ chunks (from the garden)
3 dried limes, pierced 2-3 times
1 whole anaheim chilli, slit on one side from stem to tip
Salt
5 medium tomatoes, quartered – or 6 canned tomatoes, crushed
5 oz spinach leaves

Directions

Heat the oven to 350F. Put a large dutch oven on medium heat and sauté the butter, onion, turmeric and cumin for 10 minutes.

FullSizeRender 12

Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring, for two minutes.

FullSizeRender 15

To the pot, add the fenugreek, dill, potatoes, squash, limes, chili, tomatoes, a teaspoon and a half of salt and 4 cups of water.

FullSizeRender 11

Bring to a boil, turn down the heat and boil gently for 15 minutes, until the potatoes are semi-cooked.

FullSizeRender 13

Stir in the spinach, crushing the limes gently as you do so, to release some of the juices inside.

Transfer to a large roasting tray and bake, uncovered, for 20 minutes, until the sauce has thickened a little and the vegetables are soft.

IMG_5840

Remove from the oven and let sit for five minutes, remove the limes, serve with rice and enjoy!

IMG_5841

Serves 6 – 8

Categories: Kosher, Main Dish, Persian, Recipe, Spinach, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetarian | Tags: | Leave a comment

Slow-cooker Beef Ragu

During my Levy Court campaign, pretty much the only type of cooking I did was in the crock pot – slow cooking.  The only free time I had was at the very beginning of the day, and that only for about 15 minutes. So, that meant it needed to be recipes with very little preparation before going into the crock pot.

This beef ragu was a great meal that, served with pasta, provided us with hearty meals for several days.

I was able to pick up some locally raised beef (flank steaks) at the butcher. Yes, we are lucky to have a butcher near our home.

And look at the colors (and flavors) that went into the sauce. The herbs all came from my garden.

Slow-cooker Beef Ragu

from PinchofYum.com

1 teaspoon olive oil

6 garlic cloves, smashed slightly

1½ pounds flank steak, cut against the grain into 4 pieces (locally raised)

salt and pepper

1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes

¼ cup reduced sodium beef broth

1 carrot, chopped

2 bay leaves

2 sprigs fresh thyme (from the garden)

16 ounces pappardelle pasta

Parmesan and parsley for topping

Directions

In a small skillet, heat the oil over medium high heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until golden and lightly browned, about 2 minutes.

Season the beef with 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker.

Pour the tomatoes and broth over the beef and add the garlic from step one, carrots, bay leaves, and thyme.

Cover and cook on high for 6 hours or on low for 8 to 10 hours. Discard the herbs and shred the beef in the pot using 2 forks.

Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain, return to the pot, and add the sauce from the slow cooker. Increase the heat to high and cook, stirring, until the pasta and sauce are combined, about 1 minute.

Divide among 8 bowls and top each with Parmesan, ricotta, and parsley. Serve hot!…Yum!

Serves 8.

Categories: Main Dish, Pasta, Recipe | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Lentil Loaf with Maple Balsamic Glaze

As we ate this and I was so surprised at how delicious it was, our daughter laughed and said, “What did you expect, of course it would be bad, you were making it. pause. Of course it was going to be good!” Now, you have to realize how amazing this is – growing up the girls pretty much lived on Zatarains and dreaded when I would “cook.” They still tell war stories about some of the big failures.

The change came really came about 8 years ago when I had a slow time with my business and dove into my garden and cooking for real. They started looking forward to coming home for dinner. They now tease my 7 year old that he never had to eat “bad” food (I even made just about all of his baby food).

To me, this loaf was still a shot in the dark because it was not my recipe and I have always had mixed experiences with vegetarian loafs. But this was a big hit, we all loved it, so its a keeper! (but next time I will use a narrower loaf pan, it will look prettier)

It was very reminiscent of a good meatloaf. Even the texture working with it felt like meat.

And the glaze added a nice interest and even extra flavor to an already flavorful loaf.

Lentil Loaf with Maple Balsamic Glaze
very slightly adapted from Eating Bird Food‘s Lentil Loaf with a Maple Sweetened Glaze

 

½ cup dry brown (green) lentils

1⅓ cup water

1 bay leaf

1 Tablespoon olive oil

½ large onion (about 1 heaping cup), chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 stalk of celery, chopped

1 carrot, peeled and chopped

½ cup chopped walnuts

1 cup rolled oats

3 Tablespoons soy sauce

3 Tablespoons tomato paste

2 Tablespoons ground flaxseed

2 teaspoons pure maple syrup (local)

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

¼ teaspoon dried thyme (from the garden)

1 teaspoon dried oregano (from the garden)

1 teaspoon dried basil (from the garden)

8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

¼ teaspoon ground pepper

¼ teaspoon sea salt

Maple Sweetened Glaze
2 Tablespoons tomato paste
1½ Tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar
pinch of sea salt
Directions
Heat oven to 375°.
Prepare lentils by rinsing them and adding to a pot with water and a bay leaf. Bring the water to a boil, then reduce heat down and simmer covered until all the liquid is absorbed and lentils are tender (about 15-20 minutes). Remove from heat, discard the bay leaf and set the lentils aside to cool. This step can be done in advance (it helps with time management).

In the meantime toast walnuts by spreading them onto a baking sheet and toasting in the oven for about 5 – 8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool.

In a medium pan, heat oil over medium heat. Cook onions, garlic, carrots and celery until they’ve softened and become fragrant. About 5-10 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Add lentils (reserve ½ cup for later), cooked veggies, toasted walnuts, oats, soy sauce, tomato paste, ground flaxseed, maple syrup, apple cider vinegar, thyme, oregano, basil, cayenne pepper, ground pepper and sea salt to the food processor.

Pulse until mixture is just combined and the texture is to your liking. You want the mixture to be combined enough to stick together, but you don’t want it to be completely pulverized. It should look and feel like ground beef texture.

Stir in the reserved lentils

Press mixture into parchment lined loaf pan.

In a small bowl stir together glaze ingredients.

Spread the glaze over top of the loaf.

Bake covered with foil for 25 minutes. Uncover and bake for about 8 more minutes. Let the loaf rest 15 minutes before cutting and serving. Enjoy!

Serves 6.

Categories: Carrot, Kosher, Main Dish, Recipe, Vegetarian | Tags: | 3 Comments

Spaghetti Squash Latkes

Spaghetti squash latkes, who would have thought? Zakah Glaser, that’s who; and I thank her for the recipe I found on Chabad.org.

I have to say that these were good the first day, but they were excellent as leftovers.  I have no idea why this was true, but that bodes well for making these in advance for a party or other gathering and then warming them up for serving.

Spaghetti Squash Latkes

Zakah Glaser on Chabad.org

1 spaghetti squash (from Highland Orchards)

1 onion, grated

2 eggs (from Highland Orchards)

1/4 oat bran

1 1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. black pepper, to taste

Directions

Slice the squash in half, scoop out the seeds, place face up in a baking pan and bake for 1 hour at 450ºF.

Let squash cool, then scoop out squash and mix with remaining ingredients.

Coat skillet with vegetable spray or oil and drop mixture by spoonful into pan. Brown well on both sides. Drain on paper towels.

Serve and enjoy!

Categories: Hanukah, Jewish Holiday, Main Dish, Recipe, Spaghetti Squash, Vegetarian | Tags: | Leave a comment

Kotlet Latkes – Persian Beef & Potato Patties turned into Latkes!

I really enjoy when I can blend my husband’s Persian foods with Jewish holidays. We found a perfect combination with Kotlets.  Kotlets are a small beef, potato and onion patty that is fried to crispy goodness. As my husband described them to me, his mom made them with potatoes that were mashed. But I have also seen them with grated potatoes.  Next time I will make the mashed potato version, but for our Hanukkah version – grated potatoes it was!

I used advieh and turmeric to get the flavor we wanted. If you do not have advieh, cinnamon is similar, but use less of it.

We ended up with enough to serve 6 – 8 people as a main dish. It was a fun way to start Hanukkah and celebrate our diverse household.

They were gobbled up before I got a good picture of a plate – but we ate them with parsnip fries, cucumber tomato salad and torshi (gardiniera).

Kotlet Latkes

1 – 1 1/4 lbs potatoes

1 large onion

1 pounds ground beef

½ tsp advieh

1 1/2 – 2 tsp turmeric

1/2 – 1 tsp Kosher salt

4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup oil, more if necessary

Directions

Peel the potatoes and boil in salted water until just tender, about 8 minutes. Allow to cool until you can easily handle them, then grate the potatoes.

Peel and grate the onion, squeeze out the excess water.

Mix all the ingredients (except the oil) together in a large bowl. Use your hands to mix them together really well.

Form the patties by take a handful of the meat mixture, about the size of a large egg, and form it into a flat oval (or egg-shaped) patty. It should be 1/3 – 1/2 inch thick. Repeat until all the meat mixture is made into patties.

Heat ¼ cup oil in a large nonstick or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Brown the patties on both sides, about 4 to 5 minutes on the first side, then about 3 minutes on the other side.

Drain on paper towels. Enjoy!

Serves 6 – 8.

Categories: Hanukah, Kosher, Main Dish, Recipe | 2 Comments

Kimchi Fried Rice

Last month, we got savoy cabbage and oriental radishes in our CSA box.  So I made my first kimchi. It came out surprisingly well. If I make it again, I will need to post it, but for now, it will become the star of the fried rice.

img_5043

I also had gotten a very large bok choy, half of which I froze.

Both came together in a very happy fried rice. It was perfect served with some extra kimchi as a garnish.

Kimchi Fried Rice

adapted from Ministry of Curry

6 cups of cooked Jasmine rice

3-4 eggs

1/2 cup diced onions

1/4 cup chopped scallions

4 garlic cloves minced

1 cup of Kimchi chopped with liquid

2 cups chopped bok choy

2 tbsp canola oil

Directions:

Cook rice and set aside to cool, or use day old rice.

Heat 1 tsp oil in a large wok and scramble 3-4 eggs. Remove from wok and set aside.

In the same wok add remaining oil, sauté onion  and garlic until onions turn translucent. Add chopped Kimchi with the liquid and cook on hight heat until all the liquid disappears.

Add bok choy, half of the scallions and cook for another 2 mins on high heat (with frozen bok choy it will take a bit longer to cook to get rid of the moisture). Add cooked rice, scrambled eggs and mix well. Add salt if needed.

Serve topped with the remaining scallions with additional kimchi to pass. Enjoy!

Serves 4.

 

 

 

Categories: Main Dish, Recipe, Vegetarian | Tags: | Leave a comment

Sweet Potato, Black Bean & Spinach Empanadas

I had spent days and days baking cookies and cakes for Hanukkah. I thought I was finally finished baking.  I went through 10 lbs of flour in just a few days! I put away my baking mat and pushed the standing mixer back into the corner. I was done.

And the next day…I decided to make empanadas for dinner. Out came the mixer. Out came the mat. Out came the flour…and the butter…and…

sweet potatoes from my garden and spinach from the CSA! Yes, vegetarian empanadas.

The filling was delicious, just the right amount of smokiness from the adobo sauce.  Thank goodness the recipe made extra – we munched on the filling by itself as the empanadas baked.

The pastry was one of the best I have ever made. It was super buttery and flaky.

I served it with some home-made guacamole, chipotle salsa and mild salsa.

Smoky Sweet Potato, Black Bean, and Spinach Empanadas

from Smells Like Browniescrust from Epicurious
makes 7-8

Crust:
2¼ cups flour
1½ tsp. salt
½ cup unsalted butter, cubed
1 egg
⅓ cup ice water
1 tbsp. white vinegar

Filling:
1 tbsp. olive oil
½ cup finely diced shallot
2 large cloves garlic
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. coriander
2 tsp. adobo sauce
½ tsp. salt
2 packed cups chopped baby spinach
1 15oz. can black beans, drained and rinsed
1½ cups sweet potato mash (from about 1 large sweet potato, microwaved for 7-8 minutes) (from the garden)
egg wash
guacamole, sour cream, and/or salsa, for serving

Directions

Whisk together the flour and salt for the crust. Cut in the cold butter using a pastry cutter, working until the butter is about the size of peas and well mixed with the flour.

In a separate bowl, whisk the egg. Stir in the ice water and vinegar.

Gently mix the liquid with the flour, using a fork in a fluffing motion. When all of the liquid has been mixed in and the dough is in large clumps, turn it out onto a clean work surface. Knead 5–6 times, or until all of the shaggy bits of flour have been absorbed into the dough. Shape the dough into a 1″ thick rectangle and wrap tightly with plastic wrap. Chill at least 1 hour.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the shallot and cook for 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the garlic and continue to cook until the shallot is translucent and barely beginning to brown. Stir in the cumin, coriander, adobo, and salt.

Stir in the spinach and let it wilt for 1 minute. Add the black beans and sweet potato mash and stir until all of the ingredients are thoroughly mixed together. Remove the filling from the heat and let it cool while rolling out the crust dough.

Heat the oven to 400°.

Remove the dough from the fridge and place it on a floured work surface. Roll it out to about ¼″ thickness. Use a 6″ round cutter or trace a bowl to cut 6″ circles. Re-roll the dough as needed to incorporate the scraps. Aim for 7–8 dough circles.

Transfer the crust rounds to a lined baking sheet. Brush the edges with egg wash.
Drop about ⅓ cup of the filling in the center of each circle. There may be a little filling left over, but do not give in to the temptation to over-fill the empanadas, or they will be unable to close.

Fold the dough circle in half over the filling to form a filled semicircle. Press the edges together with a fork and prick the top of each empanada 3 times to create vents.

Brush the tops of the empanadas thoroughly with egg wash.

Bake for 25–30 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown and baked through. Allow to cool 5 minutes before serving.

Serve with guacamole, sour cream, or garlicky salsa for dipping. Enjoy!

Makes 7 – 8 empanadas, serves 6 – 8.

Categories: Kosher, Main Dish, Recipe, Spinach, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetarian | Leave a comment

Stuffed Cabbage

There is a cabbage farm just a couple of miles from our house. I am glad it is not closer because at certain times of the year, it is painful to drive down that road – cabbage is a very “aromatic” crop – to put it mildy.

13439216_1020456694699484_6873497958937354807_n

picture from Papen Farms Facebook page

Naturally, cabbage was in our CSA basket.

I had already made rye bread that day, so I would continue to channel my eastern european-ness and made stuffed cabbage for dinner.

Now THIS is comfort food!

I remember stuffed cabbage being an all day process for my mother, so I thought “why would I want to put myself through that?” While I was making this dinner for 3, I realized why hers took so long.  When she made it, she was typically cooking for a holiday meal of 40 people! No wonder it took all day! Trust me, this cooks for a long time, but the actual work time is well under an hour.

Stuffed Cabbage

adapted from Prakkes in Jewish Food – The World at Table by Matthew Goodman

1 medium cabbage, about 2 lbs (locally grown)

filling

1 Tbsp canola oil

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 cup mushrooms, chopped (locally grown)

1 lb lean ground beef

sauce

1 1/2 cups tomato puree

1/3 cup lightly packed brown sugar

1/3 cup red wine vinegar

1/3 cup water

Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.  Add the cabbage to the pot and cook just a few minutes until the outer layers of leaves are pliable and can be removed without breaking (I sliced them at their base with a sharp paring knife to remove it). Place the removed leaves in a large bowl of cold water. Continue this process until you have 10 – 12 leaves removed. Save the rest of the cabbage for lining the pot.

Pat the leaves dry.  For large leaves, slice them in half, removing the center rib. Set aside.

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the the onion and mushrooms and cook, stirring often, until the onions are soft and the mushrooms are well browned. Remove from the skillet and place in a medium bowl.

Add the meat to the skillet and cook til browned, breaking up the meat with a wooden spoon. Mix into the onion-mushroom mixture, season with salt and pepper. Let cool.

Line the bottom of a heavy pot or dutch oven with the leftover cabbage leaves.

Place about 1/4 cup of the filling in the center of a cabbage leaf.  Fold the sides of the leaf to trap the filling, the roll up the leaf to form a cylinder. Place in the pot, seam side down. Repeat with the remaining leaves.

In a medium bowl, combine the tomato puree, brown sugar, vinegar and water and season with salt and pepper. Stir to combine, taste and adjust the seasoning. Pour over the stuffed cabbage. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer, covered, until the cabbage is very tender, at least 1 1/2 hours.

Serve the stuffed cabbage with the sauce spooned over it.  Enjoy!

Serves 4.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Kosher, Main Dish, Recipe | Tags: | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: